A Sorry, Sorry Affair, Shaking Heads & Shaking Hands

A Sorry Sorry Affair.

So at last we get the apology, that once again means we as Liverpool supporters can get on with just that – supporting. No longer do we have to magnify every comment from opposing fans to find small chinks of daylight in the argument, that somehow we have felt the need to stringently defend, where our minds have told us no, we find it impossible not to reply yes. I am personally exhausted by the whole argument, I have found it ridiculous how many Liverpool fans have an incredulous grasp of the whole situation.

I am understanding as to how Dalglish has wanted to defend his players and our club but I feel let down by the owners Fenway, our PR Ian Cotton and Managing Director Ian Ayre. It seems to me that it has just been left to Dalglish to take all the flack, when we actually have people employed by the club who should be deflecting the kind of poor publicity we have invariably attracted. The club have allowed outsiders to divide us, not only Liverpool Football Club but also the supporters and fans of this, our great institute.

My mother always used to say to me “That I should never spoil a good apology, with a poor excuse” this is why I am so happy with the statements from the club on the hand shaking incident. Sorry is the hardest word but we have eventually understood what our place is in football, they are custodians of our club, they have failed in their duty to represent Liverpool Football Club in a way that I am totally happy to follow blindly with 100% support. This is something I have done for many years through some of the clubs darkest days and I may also add on some of its greatest moments, moments that have formed my formative years, made me who I was, what still defines me today – him the Liverpool fan.

It again reminds me of a quote attributed with Shankly, although his historians suggest he never actually said it “If you can’t suppot us when we lose, or draw then don’t support us when we win.” So if you can’t accept that we have a responsibility to represent our club in the best of lights, that when times are dark, you are not prepared to accept we could do better, then maybe you should not be following us at all because supporters also are as much custodians as the owners.

Some so-called supporters have shamed us over the last 24 hours, some bloggers, some journalists have attempted to shame us, to disrespect Dalglish to question his legacy, to question the heritage of my club – all because of a hand-shake or the lack of a hand-shake – that too is incredibly wrong if not point scoring and bias.

If you really want to do something about racists, racism or bigotry then I suggest the next time the BNP are marching through your own city centre and are unopposed strolling across your towns, when they are throwing stones at your police I suggest that you make a stand, that you gather up the troops and point your hate toward them, yes be indignant.

While you are marching against those real racists just take a moment to look around yourself and see if there are any journalists amongst those opposed to racism in society. Is there any sign of Ollie Holt, Patrick Barclay, Martin Samuel and the many others who have been waving their swords toward those belligerent racist Liverpool fans?

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5 Comments

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5 responses to “A Sorry, Sorry Affair, Shaking Heads & Shaking Hands

  1. I agree with your sentiments.

    I have stated that I do not believe that Suarez set out to deceive Dalglish et al, but simply that he reacted to certain events on the field at the decisive moment.

    For Ayre to suggest that Suarez misled them implies intent, and I think this could have a negative impact on his relationship with the club.

    It is sad to see that the media have been successful in dividing the Liverpool camp, and now Suarez will be labelled not only the “diver”, the “racist” but now the “betrayer”, while Kenny Dalglish’ credibility is discussed by journalists conducting their own Salem witch hunt.

  2. I also don’t believe Suarez set out to deceive Dalglish. If he had, I would want nothing more to do with him. I don’t know what exactly went through his head at the relevant point. I wish he were free to tell us. Everyone else is allowed to give their two pennorth worth, apparently he cannot.

    Whoever else “apologised” yesterday, I remain personally affronted that Dalglish felt obliged to do so. He of all people did nothing wrong.

    As you stated in the article – why has Kenny, and only Kenny, been left to deal with this issue for so long? Ian Cotton, PR? Such a grand job he has done.

    • Mandy I actually wrote the article yesterday afternoon without all the apologies in yet, but Dalglish is our club so I have a much wider sorrow freshold for him,as for Suarez he is not more important than our club, he should not have reneged on his initial word, he left Dalglish in the position he subsequently found himself, the owners have come out of this smelling of roses, when they should actually be smelling rather fishy along with Ian Ayre, do your jobs, Kenny is a football Manager, Ayre is CEO and Henry a business man.

  3. Mike Nicholson

    Christopher, firstly, I agree that the apology enables us all to move on from this and support without reservation.

    However, I still feel deeply unhappy about the whole saga.

    It still, despite all the histrionics, column inches and FA verdicts comes down to one thing for me. Is Luis Suarez guilty or innocent of racially abusing Evra?

    On that note, is racial abuse not against the law of this land? The answer we know is yes, and therefore how on earth are a footballing organisation a fit and proper organisation to be judge, juror and executioner?

    Once we get past the guilty verdict, I’d invite you for a second to entertain the idea that Suarez is completely innocent. If he is, and he had his name dragged through the mud by allegations instigated by Evra, isn’t it totally understandable and completely right that he chose not to shake Evra’s hand?

    • Mike Nicholson

      Evra

      Christopher, firstly, I agree that the apology enables us all to move on from this and support without reservation. That has to be a good thing.

      However, I still feel deeply unhappy about the whole saga.

      It still, despite all the histrionics, column inches and FA verdicts comes down to one thing for me. Is Suarez guilty or not guilty of racially abusing Evra?

      Racial abuse is a criminal offence in this country, as John Terry is finding out, at a time to suit him and the F.A naturally, but criminal charges have been brought. Quite how a footballing organisation a fit and proper organisation to be judge, juror and executioner in allegations of racism is totally beyond me. Don’t get me started on that though … lets move on.

      So is Suarez guilty or innocent? I’d invite you for a second to entertain the idea that Suarez is completely innocent. If he is innocent then he had his name dragged quite spectacularly through the mud by allegations instigated by Evra, and has missed eight big games. A group of people set up to organise footie matches decided that he’s guilty, and the press take that as good enough for them. I rather think the process that the police employ to find John Terry guilty or innocent will have a shade more professionalism about it, and less a feel of he said this, and he said that.

      If Suarez is innocent, then isn’t  it totally understandable and completely right that he chose not to shake Evra’s hand? Isn’t it right that us supporters support him in the face of outside criticism, and isn’t it great that our manager stood right behind him when everyone else was slagging him off?

      I wouldn’t be accused of racism, and then shake my accusers hand just to confirm to what the establishment expect. No way. To do so would completely insult the symbolism of the hand shake as a mark of respect and fair play. If Suarez is innocent, then Evra doesn’t score all that highly on either of those criteria.

      I think that the apologies from player, manager and owners are born rather more out of a worry that this whole thing is damaging ‘brand Liverpool FC’ and the millions of lost revenue that may entail, than the heartfelt feeling that Suarez and Liverpool FC were in the wrong.

      For one, I am proud that we stood up for one of our own. If Suarez is guilty though, then he needs to have a serious word with himself.

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